For those of you who aren’t my Facebook fans, and didn’t hear about this, I stepped on a nail a couple of weeks ago while working on putting up a fence. It wasn’t a big deal, just a pain. Literally.

I didn’t realize I’d stepped on it, until I tried to move and my shoe wouldn’t budge. It wasn’t until I jerked my foot up and felt a twinge of pain when I realized that the nail had punctured my foot. After pulling my shoe off, I quickly saw the blood soaking my sock.

Great.

I really didn’t want to have to go get a Tetanus Shot. And I was highly annoyed that my careless mishap could end up costing us a pretty penny. Like we have money to be throwing away on a doctor’s visit!

I got on Facebook and many of you offered some very good advice. This is what I ended up doing: First off I cleaned the wound with Peroxide, rubbed on some Neosporin, and slapped on a bandaid.  But after reading some suggestions, I started soaking my foot in hot water with Epsom salt 2-3 times a day for at least 30 min. each time. Then I’d dry it off and, using a Q-tip, rubbed the sore with Lavender Oil (Tea Tree Oil would have been good too). I tried to let it stay unbandaged as much as possible, so that it could get lots of air.

A BIG thanks to my friends Rachel and Pat in particular, for doctoring me via the internet!

After a few days, it did begin healing nicely. I was nervous about an infection setting in, as it was a bit red and tender for those first few days. But my friends assured me that a little soreness was normal. As long as it was not very red, hot to touch, or oozing, it was doing okay.

I am glad I didn’t run straight to the doctors office. I’m not saying that you should do what I do. I’m just telling you that this worked for me.

But the whole point of me sharing this story wasn’t really to tell you how I treated a nail wound, but rather to share with you an old folk remedy that I find very interesting.

When my husband got a look at the hole in my foot the first thing he told me was that whenever he stepped on a nail as a kid, his grandfather would always put Kerosene on it. As a matter of fact, he’d put Kerosene on any broken skin.

Honestly, I thought that sounded crazy. But after asking around, other people I’ve spoken to have also recalled using Kerosene when they were growing up. When I went to visit my friend Adelia this past Monday, I told her about how I’d stepped on a nail and what I’d done to treat it. She smiled and asked, “You didn’t use Kerosene?” I was surprised that even she would say that! She showed me the little medicine bottle with a dropper in it that she uses just for Kerosene.

Hmmm. Interesting!

So, next time I think I’ll try this Kerosene remedy for a nail wound. Along with the Epsom soaks and essential oils, of course.

Have you ever heard of using Kerosene to treat wounds? Do you know of another home remedy for treating a nail puncture wound? I’m all for staying out of the doctor’s office if I can help it!