Yep. We Need A Cow. DAY 11 of the 30-Day No Grocery Shopping Challenge

It’s DAY 11 of the 30-Day No Grocery Shopping Challenge… and we definitely need a cow.

I made Gallo Pinto (Painted Rooster) to go with dinner tonight. It’s a surprisingly yummy yet simple beans and rice recipe from my favorite cookbook, Extending the Table. I love love love this book because it’s a collection of recipes from some of the poorest communities around the world. The ingredients are always very simple, yet the dishes are delicious. (I think we could learn a lot from other cultures about eating well.)

We also experimented with tofu enchiladas. I had purchased a case of extra firm non-GMO tofu several months ago (attempting to make more meatless recipes) and have yet to use it up. Since part of this challenge is to clean out our pantry of all the stuff that’s been lurking there for a while, I took the opportunity to try somethingย  different.

As we all know, you can’t have enchiladas without cheese. And I was all out of the fresh stuff.

Cracking open a $62 can of freeze dried cheese was the hardest thing I’ve had to do so far during this challenge. I almost went to the store to buy cheese just so I wouldn’t have to use the good stuff.

But I made a deal and I’m sticking to it. If I don’t try the emergency food I won’t know how we like it.

As it turned out, the tofu enchiladas were alright (I’m still trying to like tofu) but my kids scraped the cheese right off the top and said they didn’t like it. I thought the cheese was okay, but it definitely had an aftertaste. Maybe cheddar would have been better than Colby?

I was glad we all loved the beans and rice. Next time I’ll need to triple the Gallo Pinto recipe.

I’m seriously thinking we need to have a dairy cow at some point in the future. Unfortunately, we don’t have room for one here on our one acre of land. We might need to prayerfully consider looking for more land elsewhere. I know there’s all this controversy over whether humans should be drinking cow milk or not, but I can’t help but recall how our pioneer ancestors greatly depended upon their milk cow for survival.

Instant milk and freeze dried cheese are better than nothing. But to have the fresh stuff daily? Man, what a difference that would make!

I was doing some research into miniature dairy cow breeds last night, which can be raised on 1/4 acre and still give plenty of milk for a large family. Might be something to check into more seriously, though they’re quite an investment.

 

Hereโ€™s the breakdown of Day 11โ€™s challenge meals:

Breakfast:
Amish Baked Oatmeal
Hot herbal tea and honey

Snacks:
Frozen blueberries
pears
Tortilla chips
Crackers
Watermelon (a neighbor sent over half of a huge watermelon she had)

Lunch:
Spaghetti w/meat sauce, buttered sourdough bread, steamed broccoli and carrots
(or) Salmon salad on crackers

Dinner:
Gallo Pinto- black beans, kidney beans, rice (in veg. stock), cumin, onion
Tofu enchiladas- green enchilada sauce, tofu, corn tortillas, salsa, colby cheese

 

Do you think you could live long term without milk, cheese, and butter? Or do you think you’d wish you had a cow?

Kendra
About Kendra 1123 Articles

A city girl learning to homestead on an acre of land in the country. Wife and homeschooling mother of four. Enjoying life, and everything that has to do with self sufficient living.

14 Comments

  1. I have a jersey cow. If u have never had a cow before, u need to keep in mind that the cow needs to be bred again within 4 -5 months of calving if u want to keep her IN milk. Also u gotta have good pasture and / or hay. We have raised several breeds of cows but jersey is most docile and gives the most cream ( fantastic butter!)

  2. Didn’t get to post my emergency cooking equipment: Could not do without my cast-iron ware. I also have on hand several old-fashion buddy-burners. One summer, we used them when we were without electric for 4-1/2 days. We figured out a way to extinguish them for reuse. The smaller burners worked well for our six-cup percolator. I need my coffee. Have found the dry-cheese is best for cooking only. Hide it next time (smile). Thirty-nine years [and counting] in scouting [BSA] helps.

    • Thanks for the cheese tip, Kathleen. ๐Ÿ™‚ I used some of it on nachos yesterday for lunch and it turned out good. I’ll definitely try hiding it more in the future, lol.

  3. I would definitely wish I had a cow to get fresh milk and cream so I could make yogurt and cheeses! To supplement your cheese food storage in the meantime though, you might want to try Bega brand canned cheese. It’s surprisingly good and tastes like a very mild white cheddar. Also, some people have had good results waxing hard cheeses for long-term storage. I haven’t tried that personally yet but hope to do so soon ๐Ÿ™‚

  4. Cheese, maybe. Butter, absolutely not. ๐Ÿ™‚ I hadn’t heard of miniature dairy cows before – we’ll have to look into that! Some friends of ours recently purchased goats and the goat cheese/milk is working out wonderfully for them.

    • We loved having dairy goats, but I never could get butter from their milk. We may have to settle for goats again though. Not sure if we’ll ever have enough land for a cow.

  5. Spending $62 on cheese that the family won’t eat is disheartening. Now you know. I hope you find a way to make it palatable, but if not, then throw it away. Life is too short for bad cheese.

  6. Nutritional Yeast is quite good for a cheesy flavour but I appreciate that isn’t very helpful if you don’t already have some and you aren’t buying anything in at present. I like to add some smoked paprika to it too.

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